Identified Scam:

Don't Fall for This U.S. Bank Text Scam Re: Locked Account

Get a text regarding your locked banking account? It's likely a U.S. Bank text scam. Here's what you need to know to protect your identity.


Nicolle Monico
Updated 12 May 2022
Don't Fall for This U.S. Bank Text Scam Re: Locked Account
Identified Scam:
Key Finding

Fake U.S. Bank texts regarding a "locked account" are being sent to steal your personal and account information.


Key Risk

You risk having your identity and money stolen.

Sections on this page
  1. Real U.S. Bank Texts
  2. How to Spot a U.S. Bank Text Scam
  3. How to Beat U.S. Bank Text Scams
  4. What to Do if You’ve Fallen For a Fake U.S. Bank Text
  5. Frequently Asked Questions

Although U.S. Bank does send texts to its customers to alert them of suspicious activity on their account, people have been reporting fake messages posing as the financial institution alerting them of a locked account. Learn how to spot the differences between a legitimate text from the bank and a fake one as well as what to do if you’ve fallen for a U.S. Bank text scam.

Real U.S. Bank Texts

When it comes to correspondence with its banking members, U.S. bank has 6 types of messages that it sends.

  • Security Alerts: You are notified of any important changes made to your accounts such a request for a new debit card or failed login requests.
  • Account Alerts: This alert is for information regarding your account such as an eStatement being available or important updates such as your paycheck being deposited or a low balance.
  • Bill Pay Alerts: Customers can setup notifications for when bills are due or have been processed, or if your recurring payment has been paid or not.
  • Zelle Alerts: These alerts occur when someone has sent you money using Zelle or is requesting payment.
  • Branch eReceipts: This alert is for members who don’t want to use paper receipts. eReceipts can be sent via email or text and show branch transactions.

U.S. Bank Will Never Ask For:

U.S. Bank will never call or email you to ask for your account number or other confidential information. The only time you may be asked for your personal information (such as the last four digits of your SSN) is when you contact them directly.

How to Spot a U.S. Bank Text Scam

Know what to look for when you receive a text claiming to be from U.S. Bank. One example is shown below:

A fake U.S. Bank Text Scam may look like:

USBANK : Account Locked. Please visit your personal Link at :
[link start]
Enter Required Info
ID-2BGM83.mobile-usbank.com
[link end]

U.S. Bank text scam
Example of a fake U.S. bank text regarding a locked account.

If you receive a text allegedly from U.S. Bank, if it contains a link to click on in order to unlock your account, it’s likely a scam.

  • When clicked, the link may take you to a website that appears to be the real U.S. Bank website, however, it is a fake.
  • U.S. Bank’s real website is https://www.usbank.com/. Any other variation of this web address means you’re dealing with a scam.
  • Lastly, the webpage will ask you to input your personal or account information which the scammers will then have access to if you fill it out.

How to Beat U.S. Bank Text Scams

If you get a text message claiming to be from U.S. Bank that includes any of the following situations, don’t reply if it:

  • Asks for your personal or account information either directly within the text or via a link you need to click on.
  • Asks you for your personal or account information due to unauthorized purchases on your account.
  • Invites you to answer a survey in which your personal or account information is needed in order to submit the survey.
  • Requires you to confirm, update, or verify your account information, credit card or billing information.
  • Requires immediate action and threatens to close or suspend your account.
  • Tells you your account has been compromised and asks you to give or confirm your personal or account information.

What to Do if You’ve Fallen For a Fake U.S. Bank Text

If you receive a suspicious text from someone posing as U.S. Bank and you accidentally clicked on the link, there are a few things you can do to protect yourself and your account.

  • Login to your account and change your password immediately.
    • Make sure the new password is a mix of letters, numbers, characters, and avoids real words.
  • Screenshot the text and the website (including the URL) and then delete the text.
  • Forward the images to the bank at [email protected].
  • Call the U.S. Bank Fraud Liaison team at 877-595-6256 to discuss the incident so that they can view and monitor your account(s).
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Frequently Asked Questions

What types of texts does U.S. Bank send customers?

U.S. Bank sends 6 types of texts to its customers:

  • Security alerts
  • Account alerts
  • Bill Pay alerts
  • Zelle alerts
  • Branch eReceipts

However, if you get a text within these categories that asks for your personal or account information, it is likely a scam. U.S. Bank will never ask for this information unless you call them directly.

I received a U.S. Bank text asking me to verify my account to unlock it, is it real?

No, if you received a text from U.S. Bank which includes a link to click on to input personal or account information, it is a scam. Take a screenshot of the message and then forward it to [email protected]. Then delete the message.

Does U.S. Bank ever ask for personal or account information over email or text?

No, U.S. Bank will never ask for your personal or account information over email or text. The only time they will need this information is why you call them directly and it'll usually be the last four digits of your SSN. 

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