Tinder

Tinder In Depth

Sections on this page
  1. What is Tinder?
  2. Tinder Scams You Should Know About
  3. Red Flags of Tinder Scams
  4. How to Beat Tinder Scams
  5. How Tinder Protects Users

Tinder may be full of chances for meeting the love of your life, but the dating app is unfortunately also home to many scammers who are far more interested in connecting with your bank account than with you. Luckily, some tips and tools may help you look out for these types of Tinder scams and stop someone from swiping your money after swiping your picture.

What is Tinder?

Tinder is an app for meeting people—whether that's for a quick hookup, a friendship, or a serious relationship.

Launched in 2012, the app skyrocketed in popularity thanks to its easy expansion of the dating pool, but possibly even more so for its game-like platform, which turned searching for a suitable suitor into an addictive action.

Tinder scams
A look at the Tinder app on the Apple App Store.

A carousel of prospective partners in your general area—selected based on several preferences you can set—are presented one at a time, and accepting or rejecting their potential is as easy as swiping right (for 'like') or left (for 'pass'). If someone you've liked also swipes right for you, the budding relationship is honored with the opportunity to start chatting.

And fast-casual daters today have more options than ever, with more than 6.6 million Tinder users worldwide reportedly making more than 1 billion swipes a day. But that rise in use hasn't been without its rise in controversy, as the app's strange straddling of anonymity and opportunity have been exploited for any number of unsavory plots.

Tinder Scams You Should Know About

Unfortunately, Tinder's unique setup makes it an easy platform for scammers to try out all sorts of tricks. Here are some of the most common scams people encounter while using the app.

Tinder Catfishing Scam

Perhaps the most infamous scam impacting the app, the Tinder catfishing scam, involves someone posing as someone else—whether that be someone else entirely or just a more conventionally attractive version of themselves.

The point is: The person on the app isn't real. And neither is their supposed affection.

Tinder catfishers will do or say whatever it takes to gain your trust—and win your love. Then, once you're hooked, they'll start asking for financial help, bank account details, or any other helpful information they can wrangle out of you.

Heartbreakingly, the time and effort typically put into this long con can make detecting it especially difficult.

Tinder Bot Scam

Like the Tinder catfishing scam—but for robots.

The advancement of technology may be impressive, but it's not always used for the common good. These "bots" have enticing profiles and are programmed to swipe right on everyone to cast the widest net possible.

Once the matches start rolling in, the bot will send out messages, masquerading as a person but directing you to malicious websites set up to steal your information, sign you up for pricy website subscriptions, or install malware on your device.

Tinder Malware Scam

Another outgrowth of bot/catfishing Tinder scams, this is typically perpetrated by people swiping right on everyone.

Instead of a bot sending out a potentially easy-to-detect default message with a link, this scam involves someone taking the time to chat with you. They then offer to send more information about themselves, whether to share a bigger picture of who they are or even to prove to you that they are who they say they are.

To do so, they'll send a link, possibly to their personal website, Facebook page, or Instagram account. But, instead, this link will download malware on your computer or phone, which will go on to help the scammer gain access to your details.

Tinder Code Scam

Also known as the Tinder account verification scam or the Tinder verify scam, this is a much more widespread type of trick, just applied to a different platform.

In a Tinder code scam, you'll be informed via email or text that you need to "verify" your Tinder account. Typically, the message includes a few vague reasons why—like that Tinder is "updating its records."

Tinder scams
Example of a fake Tinder Safe Dating website. Tinder never takes you to a third-party location to verify your account. (Source: Broadcom)

The messages will include a link to follow to verify your account. The site may ask for information ranging from your name and birthday to your credit card number to "verify your identity," but any information you enter will be sent instead directly to scammers.

Tinder Blackmail Scam

One of the oldest tricks in the book—with a modern twist.

People will use their Tinder account to reel in matches and exploit them in many perverse ways.

Some may make a play to elicit illicit photos, then use those as leverage, threatening to disseminate them if you don't pay up. Others may target married individuals or others with a lot to lose and use the connections they make over the app or elsewhere to extract hush money.

Red Flags of Tinder Scams

When it comes to Tinder scams, as with so much else, knowledge is power.

Knowing what to look out for can help you stop a Tinder scam before it even starts. And knowing how to shut down the situation can help, even if it's already begun.

Scammers are constantly evolving their schemes—and the introduction of bots to the mix may make it even more challenging to spot a Tinder scam. Add in the emotional state that guides many people through their use of the app—whether it's the desperation for a relationship or the desire for a hookup—and it becomes even easier for scammers to operate.

But if you notice any of these red flags, they may be signaling a Tinder scam:

  • A profile with any of the following:
    • Between 1-3 very similar-looking photos.
    • Just one very provocative photo.
    • Glamour shots or professional modeling shots only.
    • Limited or no information.
  • A conversation with a match that:
    • Happens right away. Most bots will almost automatically respond to a match.
    • Gets very suggestive, very quickly.
    • Gets very emotional, very quickly.
    • Involves strange or seemingly unconnected answers to questions. This might be the sign of a chatbot.
  • A match that:
    • Sends you a link for any reason.
    • Asks for nude or illicit photos, especially early on.
    • Asks for money or sensitive personal details for any reason.
    • Asks to take the conversation to a different platform, like Whatsapp, Snapchat, or even texting.
    • Lives far away or won't make committed plans to see you.

How to Beat Tinder Scams

If you think you're dealing with a Tinder scam, don't worry. There are a few ways to stop the situation:

  • Never send any Tinder matches money, financial information, or sensitive personal details, including your:
    • Social Security number.
    • Home address.
    • Daily routine information for you or your family.
  • Keep conversations on the Tinder platform during the "getting to know you" phase. The app offers some protections (more below) that aren't available on other platforms.
  • Never open any links sent to you by a Tinder match.
  • If you think you're dealing with a bot, ask a very complicated or specific question. The algorithm will struggle to create a coherent response.
  • Don't send compromising photos—especially if you haven't met the person in real life.

When it comes to Tinder verify scams, you should also know that the app only asks certain public figures or brands to officially "verify" their accounts or identities.

Further, Tinder will never ask you to verify through a third party.

Contact Details

Tinder



Verified.org

Verified Contact Details

It's important to verify links and contact details to beat imposters.

How Tinder Protects Users

As the number of Tinder users—and Tinder scams—has continued to rise, Tinder itself has stepped in, rolling out some initiatives to help keep swipers safe.

Keeping your conversations within the app may be helpful, as Tinder has created something called a Safe Message Filter, which scans for inappropriate or chatbot messages and may be able to alert Tinder's scam protection team of potential issues.

You can also report any problems directly to Tinder, either online or through the app itself. Report users through the app by:

  • Going to your match list, swiping left on a row, and tapping the report button.
  • Going to your message screen and tapping on the flag icon.
  • Go to a person's profile page, hit the three dots, and then select the "Report" option.

Scammers Can be Banned on Tinder

Tinder takes its Terms of Use and Community Guidelines very seriously. If anyone is found to violate these terms, they will be banned. The only way they can start using Tinder again is if they create a different profile using new credentials.

If you think a Tinder scammer got a hold of your financial information or has stolen your identity, you should:

  • Report the incident to:
  • Freeze any credit or debit cards involved.
  • Change all of your passwords.
  • Keep a close eye on your financial accounts and activity.

And for more severe problems, including stalking or harassment, you can and should also contact your local police as soon as possible.

Remember: You're never sure exactly who you're talking to online. Be safe!

Scams Impacting Tinder

Sort by:
Tinder Code Scam Leads to Monthly Porn Subscriptions
7 October 2021 |

Tinder Code Scam Leads to Monthly Porn Subscriptions

The Tinder safe dating scam tricks users into giving up their credit card info to verify their profiles and leads to auto-enrollment in monthly subscription-based porn sites.

Scams in Other Categories...
How to Protect Yourself from 6 Common Apple Pay Scams
10 March 2022 |

How to Protect Yourself from 6 Common Apple Pay Scams

Apple Pay may be a convenient way to send money, but it's also become a favorite among scammers looking to make a quick buck at your expense.

Apple Support Scam: Beware of Callers Impersonating Apple
13 December 2021 |

Apple Support Scam: Beware of Callers Impersonating Apple

If you receive a phone call from Apple Support, it could be a scammer attempting to steal your information and access your accounts.

Beware of Fake Apple Phishing Emails: Don't Click Any Links
8 December 2021 |

Beware of Fake Apple Phishing Emails: Don't Click Any Links

If you've been notified that your Apple ID has been locked, don't click the link in the email as this could be an attempt to steal your password.

Apple Gift Card Scam: Red Flags of Imposters After Your Money

Apple Gift Card Scam: Red Flags of Imposters After Your Money

Whether it's the IRS, Social Security office, or a relative, be careful with anyone asking for payment via an Apple gift card—it's likely a scam.

How Do You Beat Gift Card Scams? Never Pay Using Gift Cards

How Do You Beat Gift Card Scams? Never Pay Using Gift Cards

Beating this scam is simple—don't pay for anything using gift cards and don't give anyone you don't know or trust your gift card information.

FedEx Text Scam: Fake Delivery Alerts & Notifications
23 September 2022 |

FedEx Text Scam: Fake Delivery Alerts & Notifications

FedEx is warning customers of a fake text alert going around regarding an issue with a delivery. Learn how to avoid this tricky scam.

Real Chase Fraud Text Alert or Scam Message?
6 September 2022 |

Real Chase Fraud Text Alert or Scam Message?

If you receive a text message from Chase Bank, don't click on any links or call the phone number listed—it could be a scam designed to steal your information and money.

Truist Text Alert: How to Identify a Real Text from a Scam
6 September 2022 |

Truist Text Alert: How to Identify a Real Text from a Scam

You may think that that Truist have sent you a text alert about your account. Here's how to check if it is actually a scam.

Guides To Protect Against Computers & Technology Scams

Sort by:
How to Unmatch With Someone on Tinder
22 March 2022 |

How to Unmatch With Someone on Tinder

Whether you're no longer interested or there wasn't a connection in person, here's how to unmatch someone on Tinder in a few simple steps.

Guides in Other Categories...
Real or Fake Apple Watch? 8 Ways to Tell the Difference
20 June 2022 |

Real or Fake Apple Watch? 8 Ways to Tell the Difference

Although a lot of work has been done to remove counterfeit Apple products from shelves and online stores, fake Apple watches are still easy to come by.

Real vs. Fake Apple Power Adapters: 4 Signs of a Replica
28 April 2022 |

Real vs. Fake Apple Power Adapters: 4 Signs of a Replica

Apple power adapters might be more expensive than other brands you can buy, but buying the real deal can protect both your own safety and your Apple computer.

Cost of Streaming Services in 2022 (And How It's Changed Over the Years)
18 March 2022 |

Cost of Streaming Services in 2022 (And How It's Changed Over the Years)

With the recent Netflix price hike on all of its plans, what can we expect for the other streaming services this year? We take a look at how the cost of streaming services has changed over the years.

Real vs. Fake AirPods Pro—9 Ways to Tell the Difference
17 March 2022 |

Real vs. Fake AirPods Pro—9 Ways to Tell the Difference

At $250 a pop, the last thing you want when buying AirPods Pro is to end up with a fake that uses cheap materials and doesn’t work how you expect it to.

News About Computers & Technology Scams

Sort by:
News in Other Categories...
Apple Fights Back Against Counterfeiters on Social Media
18 August 2021 |

Apple Fights Back Against Counterfeiters on Social Media

Apple creates a team for the sole purpose of removing fake products from social media sites.

Roe vs. Wade Overturned: Abortion Rights in Your State

Roe vs. Wade Overturned: Abortion Rights in Your State

Find out what the overturning of Roe vs. Wade means for abortion rights in your state.

Searches for "COVID Vaccine 5G" Hit All-Time High, But Microchips Definitely Not in Vaccine
2 February 2022 |

Searches for "COVID Vaccine 5G" Hit All-Time High, But Microchips Definitely Not in Vaccine

The number of people searching for the term "COVID vaccine 5G" on Google has just hit an all-time high, but there's one way to be sure that there are no microchips.

Social Media: The New Favorite Amongst Scammers
1 February 2022 |

Social Media: The New Favorite Amongst Scammers

Social media platforms are possibly the most used tools in committing fraud, responsible for $770 million in losses.

Beware When Scanning QR Codes, Even for Menus
20 January 2022 |

Beware When Scanning QR Codes, Even for Menus

The FBI is warning Americans about a new scam circulating in the country involving fraudulent QR codes in public places.